LD-00700 Characteristics of an E-Myth Manager

How will we develop managers who can create a place people value?


 Prins Insurance, Inc. Sioux Falls

 

CHARACTERISTICS OF AN E-MYTH MANAGER

 

SELF DEVELOPMENT WORKSHEET DICK APPLEQUIST

 

Date of Worksheet:  8-24-02

 

Characteristics under development:

 

  1. Thoroughness and persistence
  2. Willingness to listen
  3. Calmness
  4. Patience
  5. Commitment to improvement

 

Successful incidents relating to the above characteristics:

 

  1. Thoroughness and persistence Some operating systems are in place for taking surveys, quoting, and written proposals.  These are used as they were designed, and will only change when we change the system.  Everyone will follow the system.  
  2. Willingness to listen I take the time to listen to a personnel problems and try to understand all points of view before making any decisions for action.
  3. Calmness I can remain calm in when I know everything is under control.  My calmness is good when I perceive that we have control and can get our required work done.
  4. Patience I am patient with major problems that I think are important.  As an example, I can work long hours on developing a system to move clients from an insurance company that is no longer writing business in the state to other insurance companies we have available in our agency.  I can work with employees and clients in a patient manner.
  5. Commitment to improvement Taking the E-Myth mastery course and purchasing a new agency management system show successful examples of this trait.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unsuccessful incidents relating to the above characteristics.

 

  1. Thoroughness and persistence We started a monthly bonus program based on each employee being able to abide by certain standards of conduct.  We paid one employee the bonus even though she did not achieve success.  We confused her and others.
  2. Willingness to listen I do not take the time to listen to minor problems our customer service agents have with clients or underwriters.  Implementing systems can cure most of these problems.  I dont listen because I think that I have greater things to work on and dont want to waste my time.  I realize this has to change by implementing new systems and by listening to concerns that are small or large.   Its the little things done properly that make a big difference in relationships with employees, clients and underwriters.
  3. Calmness I will sometimes not appear calm if I think I dont have things under control.  If we have someone quit or extra work piles up and I dont feel in control, I will show it in my actions.   I may have snappy answers to small questions and I get more impatient with everybody.
  4. Patience I am impatient with small problems that I dont think are important.  Sometimes Im impatient because I think the person who wants help should have known the answer or found the answer themselves in our books or company manuals.  I do realize that we deal with many insurance companies and many company manuals and that its hard for everyone to understand everything and have the answers at their fingertips.  I need to work patiently with all questions and problems.
  5. Commitment to improvement When a system isnt needed, I get lulled into inaction until something happens that requires action.  I need to keep old systems up to date and continue using them until the old system is changed.  An example is our underwriting guide for new business:  We had a complete guide and useful system that worked great. When everyone used the guide for a long time and understood everything, we stopped updating the guide, and soon it became worthless.  Now, when we have a new employee, we have a worthless underwriting guide, and no system for training in place.